A museum dedicated to country icon Patsy Cline is planned for downtown Nashville. An opening date has not yet been announced, but construction will begin in June.

Located directly above the Johnny Cash Museum on Third Avenue in Music City, the Patsy Cline Museum will host the largest collection of Cline-related artifacts in the world, according to a press release. The singer's personal possessions, costumes, awards, letters, furniture and photos, culled from her family's archives, will be on display, coupled with interactive audio- and video-based exhibits.

"Since the passing of our father last fall, this is our first step together in continuing to share Mom’s music, life and story, as we feel Dad would have," Julie Fudge, Cline's daughter, says. "We are thrilled to have the opportunity ..."

Bill Miller, the founder of the Johnny Cash Museum, along with his wife Shannon, will fund and operate the Patsy Cline Museum.

"Of all the artists in the history of country music, few are as recognized and as recognizable as Patsy Cline. Despite the fact that she passed decades ago, her impact and presence are every bit as big today as ever. She has transcended generations and genres and is indisputably the greatest and most influential female country music artist of all time," Bill Miller states. "She's a true icon deserving of her own museum. Her fans from around the globe will have a place to come and celebrate her life and legacy. It's a pleasure and an honor to be working with Patsy's children on this world-class museum project."

Cline died in a tragic airplane crash on March 5, 1963, at just 30 years old, but her legacy in country music is immense: Her hit songs, such as “Crazy” and “I Fall to Pieces,” among many others, earned her success in both the country and pop genres, and she was the first female solo artist to be inducted into the Country Music Hall of Fame. She has also been honored on a U.S. postage stamp and with a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame.

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