The Associated Press has called New Jersey for Democratic Presidential Candidate Joe Biden.

Update, 8:30 p.m.: Ken Kamen, president of Mercadien Asset Management, says historically the market doesn't care much who wins — but it doesn't like uncertainty.

Whatever happens this week, “things look pretty good once we have a leader or new president,” he said. Kamen expects a good reaction if the tumult predicted by some on each side of the political divide never happens.

Will market react on Wednesday if there's no winner on Tuesday?

It's up over 1,000 points in the last few days, Kamen said. "The market doesn’t care."

Update, 8:30 p.m.: John Weingart, associate director of the Eagleton Institute at Rutgers, said this race was "all about Donald Trump."

"All the conversation, all the people making up their mind" centered on the president he said.

Weingart said there were three groups in play: "Whether they thought Donald Trump was a wonderful man and a wonderful president, not such a wonderful man but still a wonderful president or whether they want to oppose him and get rid of him and get someone new in."

Re-election always a forum on the incumbent, he told New Jersey 101.5's Eric Scott.

"Ever seen a personality driven election combined with pandemic? The country is very divided. However the race turns out it will still be divided."

Update, 8:10 p.m.:

The AP made the pronouncement as polls closed, even though for the 2020 election, New Jersey may not have the full results for weeks. New Jersey has been considered safe territory for the Democrat, well ahead in the local polls in what's been a reliably blue state for decades.

A survey of voters in New Jersey in the last days of the election predicted former Biden would easily grab the Garden State's 14 electoral votes. The Rutgers-Eagleton Poll conducted Oct. 18-24, found Biden leading among likely voters with 61% to President Donald Trump's 37%.

Among virtually every demographic, Biden dominated the poll. He led Trump with men with just 51 percent of the vote, and and among white voters overall, Biden and Trump tied with 49%.

Among non-white voters, Biden led with 78%. Among women, Biden led with 70%.

See here throughout Election Day and Night for updates, as well as unofficial results as they come in. Results will not include provisional ballots cast on Election Day, and may not include all mail-in or machine votes. 

Election watchers should note, however, that Tuesday night's results will not include mail-in ballots that are still working their way through the mail or the provisional ballots filled out by voters at polling places on Tuesday. Counties will not begin to count provisional votes until Nov. 10, to make sure those same voters did not also vote by mail.

Update, 7:55 p.m.:

7:35 pm. – Daniel Bowen, political scientist at the College of New Jersey, says the stark difference between candidates is motivating voters, with President Trump in particular looming large as a polarizing figure.

He told New Jersey 101.5's Eric Scott voters have been looking forward to the opportunity to have their voices heard.

Can the “super high engagement” be sustained into next year's gubernatorial race, as New Jersey looks at a vote-by-mail turnout likely to beat all of 2016's turnout? No, not with everyone, Bowen said. But voting and engagement could become a habit with some people in the future.

Update, 3:30 p.m:

By Tuesday, counties had already received more than 3.7 million votes, which already was close to the 3.87 million who voted four years ago.

A Rutgers-Eagleton Poll conducted Oct. 18 to 24 found Biden leading among likely voters with 61% to President Donald Trump's 37%.

The survey found that Biden's support cut across the state's diverse spectrum, with the Democrat leading Trump in most demographics and basically tying with Trump in two.