In modern times, we look at lobsters as a delicious delicacy.

The price of lobster demonstrates this at the cash register each and every time at the point of sale.

Did you know that lobsters used to be considered bottom feeders during the American colonial period during the 17th Century?

Lobsters weren’t even considered to be food. They were begrudgingly eaten by the poor, fed to prisoners in jail and sometimes fed to animals.

By the 1950’s, lobsters became a delicacy and they became popular amongst the rich and famous.

When you think about lobsters … the first thing that probably comes to mind is Maine lobsters. They are famous for bring sweet, rich and delicious … considered to be the gold standard of lobsters around the United States.

However, Atlantic City area has great lobsters, too.

Several years ago, a very good friend of mine (John Devlin) told me about the amazing lobsters that are caught about 6-10 miles (sometimes a bit farther) off of the coast of Atlantic City.

Before this, I had never given any thought that we even had lobsters right here at home.

It's another one of those, in order to get "the best." you have to go somewhere else to get it. "The best" couldn't possibly be right here at home the whole time.

Just like many people think that Baltimore, Maryland crabs are better than our local Blue Crabs ... it's just not true. Some persons, places or things get a reputation (whether deserved or not) for being the best.

We purchased six (6) "Atlantic City Lobsters," including a magnum-sized 4 pounder. The claw on this one lobster was almost as big as my hand.

These six "Atlantic City Lobsters" fed 4 different families, for a total of 10 Family Members enjoying this crustacean delicacy.

Lobsters grow to about 1 1/2 pounds in 5-7 years.

Our 4-pounder was estimated to be about 20-25 years old. If you're using the 7-10 years per pound "math" ... for each pound, per-year ... our lobster could have been as old as 30-35 years.

Here's what it looked like before and after prepared:

Harry Hurley photo.
Harry Hurley photo.
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An interesting New Jersey lobster fact is that 5 pounds is the maximum size/weight that you can legally keep.

I went to the official NOAA records, which indicated that revenue from American lobster landings in New Jersey totaled over $2.2 million by 2015.

It's tough work for the lobstermen. Mother Nature can be brutal out there; unforgiving and it really beats up the fishermen. They're working hard with their own hands and delivering to us an amazing delicacy that we have the privilege to enjoy.

After I posted on social media about the great time that we had as a Family, so many people commented that they never knew that there was such a thing as "Atlantic City Lobsters."

Yes, Atlantic City lobsters are a real thing and they're fantastic!

The flavor and texture is wonderful. In fact, these lobsters were so good that they didn't require to be dunked or drenched with melted, salted butter.

No Old Bay or any other special seasoning was required, either.

We steamed them for about 15 minutes and served them. Our expert Lobsterman told us ... "Don't let the lobsters touch the water while cooking. Just let the steam cook them."

I can confidently say that these "Atlantic City Lobsters" were as fine as any that I've ever had anywhere!

As Dorothy Gale famously said ... "There's No Place Like Home."

Here are a few more photos from our wonderful “Atlantic City Lobster" extravaganza:

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I hope that you enjoyed our walk together down lobster memory lane.

As always …

Bon appétit.

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