At the 2019 ASCAP Country Music Awards in November, Jordan Davis reflected that songwriting -- and ASCAP, or the American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers, in particular -- has been deeply important to him ever since his early days as a musician.

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"ASCAP was day one for me," the singer says. He doesn't mean that metaphorically. "I think I moved to town on a Sunday, and I was in the ASCAP building on Monday."

During the following years of trying to make it as an artist, Davis says, the songwriting organization always provided him a measure of support and reassurance. "Those are the years that you really, really need that comfort that you made the right choice, and just the extra kick to get out there and chase it. ASCAP's been there for me from day one, and it's still there," he explains.

Over that period of time, Davis has seen his star rise as an artist with hits on country radio. Just as importantly, though, he's grown as a songwriter.

"Somebody asked me earlier what the biggest misconception about songwriting is. I once heard somebody say, 'Well, you're either born with it or you're not,' and I just don't think that's the case," he argues. "I was not anywhere near as good a songwriter as I am now -- I'm not saying I'm a great songwriter by any means, but I'm a lot better than I was when I moved to Nashville."

Davis hopes that dispelling the mystique of songwriting as an innate talent will encourage younger writers to keep honing their craft, even if it's discouraging at first. "It's something that I've seen myself get better at," he points out. "Trust me, if I can get better at it, anybody can get better at it."