Men are from Mars, women are from Venus, right? Men and women see the world through completely different perspectives so it only makes sense that they would communicate in different ways. Do you ever feel like when you are talking to the opposite sex you speaking another language?  Like they just don’t understand what you are saying?  The key is trying to figure out each other’s perspective and language so we can learn to communicate in ways the opposite sex can understand.  Here are the different ways men and women communicate and how we can make some simple changes to reach each other better.

 

  • 1

    Talking

    Men and women convey different messages when talking. With men, it is straight to the point. Men think communication should have a clear purpose. Behind every conversation is a problem that needs solving or a point that needs to be made.

    Women communicate to discover how they feeling. They see conversation as an act of sharing and an opportunity to increase intimacy with her partner. Through sharing, women release negative feelings and create feelings of bonding.

  • 2

    Prioritizing

    Men sort through the details and only provide the information they think is essential to the story or conversation.  They prioritize efficiency.

    Women use communication to help organize their thoughts, not always knowing what information is needed until it she says it. A woman isn’t necessarily searching for a solution when she initiates a conversation. She’s looking for someone to listen and understand what she’s feeling.

  • 3

    Change the Approach

    Men want to feel competent and they may interpret a woman speaking as telling them what to do.

    How women can change their approach:

    Rather than telling a man what to do, suggest or ask the question. Instead of "Honey, you need to clean out the garage," try "What do you think of tackling the garage this weekend?"

    Women often feel men are not listening or taking their concerns seriously.

    How men can change their approach:

    Instead of “You’re making a mountain out of a molehill” or “You’re getting overly emotional about it," try, "I understand how you feel. Is there anything I can do to help?"